They Love You, But Your Hearing Loss Affects Them, Too

  If you have hearing difficulties, you’re not experiencing them alone. Hearing loss is a family affair, which adds to the importance of addressing it early. Learn how your hearing loss may be affecting the person closest to you — and what you can do.

  Has your beloved asked you one, two, or a ton of times to turn the TV down? It’s not uncommon for loved ones to have to deal with louder volumes when a significant other has hearing loss. In fact, it’s one of the potential signs of hearing problems.

  What’s more, untreated hearing loss may mean your sweetheart has to:

Speak at higher-than-normal volumes to help you follow the discussion

Repeat themselves often, which can feel frustrating and tiring

Serve as a constant go-between to explain what others are saying

  Partners of those with hearing loss have also reported stress, isolation, and other challenges, according to research. *Plus, poor hearing can lead to miscommunication or the perception that the other person isn’t listening or engaged. It can all add up to a strain on the relationship.

  The good news? Adults treated for hearing loss report significant improvement in relationships — and so do the people who love them. *Here are some steps you can take:

If loved ones are complaining about your TV volume, schedule a hearing exam.

Already have hearing aids? Wear them regularly and practice good maintenance.

Explore your hearing aids’ streaming capabilities, sending customized audio directly to your ears — without changing the volume for everybody else.

  Speak honestly about how hearing loss affects both of you — and how you can support each other.

  Hearing plays a big role in relationships, so don’t wait. Schedule a consultation with our caring team at Garden State Hearing today! We hear you and are here for you. We can be reached at 732-818-3610 or visit us at Gardenstatehearing.com.

*Sage Journals | Trends in Hearing. A Data-Driven Synthesis of Research Evidence for Domains of Hearing Loss, as Reported by Adults With Hearing Loss and Their Communication Partners. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2331216517734088. Accessed Nov. 9, 2020. 

**National Council on Aging. The Consequences of Untreated Hearing Loss in Older Persons. https://www.ncoa.org/resources/the-consequences-of-untreated-hearing-loss-in-older-adults/. Accessed Nov. 9, 2020.

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Dr. Kirsh has over 25 years of hearing care experience. Dr. Kirsh received a B.A. in Biopsychology from the University of Maryland, a Master’s of Education (Audiology) from the University of Virginia and a Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with area of specialization in Audiology from the Union Institute (The Graduate School). Dr. Kirsh completed a fellowship at the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, has multiple publications, and has received numerous continuing education awards from both ASHA and AAA. Dr. Kirsh is currently a Founder and Director for Audigy Group and has previously served on the Sonus Network advisory board. Dr. Kirsh’s wife, Shira Kirsh, is a Speech-Language Pathologist in private practice at Alliance Speech & Hearing Center (Howell, N.J., 732-942-7220)-an affiliate of GSHBC. Dr. Kirsh has two beautiful children, Melanie and Joseph.